8 Cholecystectomy Nursing Care Plans

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Definition

A cholecystectomy consists of excising the gallbladder from the posterior liver wall and ligating the cystic duct, vein, and artery. The surgeon usually approaches the gallbladder through a right upper paramedian or upper midline incision if necessary, the common duct may be explored through this incision. When stones are suspected in the common duct, operative cholangiography may be performed (if it has not been ordered preoperatively). The surgeon may dilate the common duct if it is already dilated as a result of a pathologic process. Dilation facilitates stone removal. The surgeon passes a thin instrument into the duct to collect the stones, either whole or after crushing them.

After exploring the common duct, the surgeon usually inserts a T0tube to ensure adequate bile drainage during duct healing (choledochostomy). The T-tube also provides a route for postoperative cholangiography or stone dissolution, when appropriate.

A conventional open cholecystectomy is indicated when a laparoscopic cholecystectomy does not allow for retrieval of a stone in the common bile duct and when the client’s physique does not allow access to the gallbladder. Occasionally, when a client is very obese, the gallbladder is not retrievable via laparoscopic instruments. Further, a surgeon may have difficulty accessing the gallbladder in an adult with a small frame and may need to perform the conventional open cholecystectomy.

Nursing Care Plans

Here are 8 nursing care plans for patients with cholecystectomy.

Preoperative Problem: Acute Pain

The flow of bile in the gallbladder is obstructed due to the presence of stones. When the bladder releases bile, it contracts and there is spasm, thus it cannot adequately release bile due to the stone, it stimulates the release of cytokines resulting to pain.

Preoperative Problem: Fear

Undergoing open cholecystectomy, the patient may perceive threat like the outcome of the surgery that is consciously recognized by the client as danger

Ineffective Breathing Pattern

Respirations may be increased as a result of pain or as an initial compensatory mechanism. however, increased work of breathing may indicate increasing oxygen consumption and energy expenditures and/or reduced respiratory reserve.

Risk for Aspiration

Prior to any surgical invasion, general anesthesia is induced. It relaxes the muscles of the body and depresses the sensation of pain, thus the gag and swallowing reflex is temporarily suppressed that may lead to aspiration.

Postoperative Acute Pain

In performing cholecystectomy, surgical incision is done. By which, the incision causes direct irritation to the nerve endings by chemical mediators released at the site such as bradykinin. This irritation will send signal to the cortex and thalamus of the brain thus producing pain perception.

Activity Intolerance

Post-op pt. usually is under bed rest for few days that may hinder them to their usual activity. Presence of surgical incision procedures causes the pt. to be reluctant in doing personal activities, because those may result in the stimulation of the nerve endings, during movement, thus, increase pain sensation.

Impaired Physical Mobility

Presence of surgical incision procedures causes the pt. to be reluctant in doing movements such as ROM, because those may result in the stimulation of the nerve endings, during movement, thus, increase pain sensation.

Risk for Infection

The patient is at risk of acquiring infection due to the break in the continuity of the first line defense which is the skin. The patient shall have undergone cholecystectomy, thus there is an incision and suture made in the abdomen. If there is a breakage in the skin, the pathogens will easily invade the body’s system thus increasing risk for infection.

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