Home Notes Nursing Pharmacology

Nursing Pharmacology

Complete and simplified nursing pharmacology study guides for student nurses. Useful tips in understanding different drugs and medicines – a perfect companion for your NCLEX review.

Thyroid Agents Nursing Pharmacology and Study Guide

Thyroid Agents

The thyroid gland uses iodine to produce thyroid hormones that regulate body metabolism. Thyroid agents either replace or remove hormones to prevent deficiency and excess. Thyroid agents include thyroid hormones (T3, T4, TSH)and antithyroid drugs (further classified as thioamides and iodine solution).
Insulin Nursing Pharmacology Study Guide

Insulin

Insulin is the hormone produced by the pancreatic beta cells of the islets of Langerhans.
Glucose-Elevating Agents Nursing Pharmacology and Study Guide

Glucose-Elevating Agents

Glucose-elevating agents raise blood level of glucose when severe hypoglycemia occurs at <40 mg/dL.
Sulfonylureas Nursing Pharmacology and Study Guide

Sulfonylureas

Sulfonylureas is another group of agent used to control blood glucose level.
Antidiabetic Agents Nursing Pharmacology and Study Guide

Antidiabetic Agents

Antidiabetic drugs are a group of drug structurally unrelated to sulfonylureas and are effective when used in combination with insulin or sulfonylureas.
Adrenergic Agonists (Sympathomimetics) Nursing Pharmacology Study Guides

Adrenergic Agonists (Sympathomimetics)

Adrenergic agonists are autonomic nervous system drugs that stimulate the adrenergic receptors of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), either directly (by reacting with receptor sites) or indirectly (by increasing norepinephrine levels). An adrenergic agonist is also called a sympathomimetic because it stimulates the effects of SNS.
Adrenergic Antagonists (Sympatholytics) Nursing Pharmacology Study Guides

Adrenergic Antagonists (Sympatholytics)

Adrenergic antagonists are also referred to as sympatholytics because they lyse, or block, the effects of the sympathetic nervous system. They react with specific adrenergic receptor sites without activating them, thus preventing the typical manifestations of SNS activation.
Anticholinergics (Parasympatholytics)

Anticholinergics (Parasympatholytics)

Anticholinergics are drugs that oppose the effects of acetylcholine. In essence, they also lyse and block the effects of parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) so they are also called as parasympatholytics.
Cholinergic Agonists (Parasympathomimetics) Nursing Pharmacology Study Guides

Cholinergic Agonists (Parasympathomimetics)

Cholinergic agonists act at the same site as the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) and increase the activity of the ACh receptor sites throughout the body. Cholinergic agonists act at the same site as the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) and increase the activity of the ACh receptor sites throughout the body.Cholinergic agonists act at the same site as the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) and increase the activity of the ACh receptor sites throughout the body. They are also called as parasympathomimetics.
Immune Stimulants Nursing Pharmacology Study Guides

Immunostimulants

Immunostimulants or immune stimulants are drugs that energize the immune system when it is exhausted from fighting prolonged invasion or when the immune system needs help fighting a specific pathogen or cancer cell. It is one of the classifications of drug class called immunomodulators.

RECENT POSTS