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Anatomy & Physiology

Anatomy and Physiology of different body systems.

Blood Anatomy and Physiology

Blood Anatomy and Physiology

Blood is the “river of life” that surges within us. It transports everything that must be carried from one place to another within the body- nutrients, wastes (headed for elimination from the body) and body heat through blood vessels. Long before modern medicine, blood was viewed as magical, because when it drained from the body, life departed as well.
- Lymphatic System Anatomy and Physiology

Lymphatic System Anatomy and Physiology

The lymphatic system includes lymph, lymphocytes, lymphatic vessels, lymph nodes, tonsils, the spleen, and the thymus gland.
- Muscular System Anatomy and Physiology

Muscular System Anatomy and Physiology

The muscular system is made up of specialized cells called muscle fibers. Their main function is contractibility. Muscles, connected to bones or internal organs and blood vessels, are in charge for movement. Almost every movement in the body is the outcome of muscle contraction.
Endocrine System Anatomy and Physiology

Endocrine System Anatomy and Physiology

The major endocrine organs of the body include the pituitary, thyroid, parathyroid, adrenal, pineal and thymus glands, the pancreas, and the gonads. The regulatory functions of the nervous and endocrine systems are similar in some aspects, but differ in such ways.

Skeletal System Anatomy and Physiology

The skeletal system consists of bones and their associated connective tissues, including cartilage, tendons, and ligaments. It consists of dynamic, living tissues that are capable of growth, detect pain stimuli, adapt to stress, and undergo repair after injury.
Nervous System Anatomy and Physiology

Nervous System Anatomy and Physiology

The nervous system is involved in some way in nearly every body function. All the sensations, actions, and emotions are made possible by the nervous system, which consists of the brain, spinal cord, nerves, and sensory receptors.
Integumentary System Anatomy and Physiology

Integumentary System Anatomy and Physiology

The integumentary system consists of the skin and accessory structures, such as hair, nails, and glands. The integumentary system is recognizable to most people because it covers the outside of the body and is easily observed.
Featured-Digestive System Anatomy and Physiology

Digestive System Anatomy and Physiology

Learn about the digestive system here.
Urinary System Anatomy and Physiology

Urinary System Anatomy and Physiology

Much like sanitation workers who keep a city's water supply drinkable and dispose of its waste, the kidneys are usually unappreciated until there is a malfunction and "internal garbage" piles up.
Respiratory System Anatomy and Physiology

Respiratory System Anatomy and Physiology

The trillions of cells in the body require an abundant and continuous supply of oxygen to carry out their vital functions. We cannot “do without oxygen” for even a little while, as we can without food or water.

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