5 Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) Nursing Care Plans

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Benign prostatic hyperplasia or benign prostatic hypertrophy is characterized by progressive enlargement of the prostate gland (commonly seen in men older than age 50), causing varying degrees of urethral obstruction and restriction of urinary flow. Depending on the size of the enlarged prostate, age and health of the patient, and the extent of obstruction, BPH is treated symptomatically or surgically.

Nursing Care Plans

Nursing care for patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia includes preparation for surgery (if possible) administration of medications for pain, and relieving urinary retention.

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Below are five (5) nursing care plans (NCP) and nursing diagnosis for benign prostatic hyperplasia:

  1. Urinary Retention
  2. Acute Pain
  3. Risk for Deficient Fluid Volume
  4. Fear/Anxiety
  5. Deficient Knowledge
  6. See Also and Further Reading
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Risk for Deficient Fluid Volume

Nursing Diagnosis

Risk factors may include

  • Postobstructive diuresis from rapid drainage of a chronically overdistended bladder
  • Endocrine, electrolyte imbalances (renal dysfunction)

Desired Outcomes

  • Maintain adequate hydration as evidenced by stable vital signs, palpable peripheral pulses, good capillary refill, and moist mucous membranes.
Nursing InterventionsRationale
Monitor output carefully. Note outputs of 100–200 mL per hr.Rapid and sustained diuresis could cause patient’s total fluid volume to become depleted and limits sodium reabsorption in renal tubules.
Encourage increased oral intake based on individual needs.Patient may have restricted oral intake in an attempt to control urinary symptoms, reducing homeostatic reserves and increasing risk of dehydration and hypovolemia.
Monitor BP, pulse. Evaluate capillary refill and oral mucous membranes.Enables early detection of and intervention for systemic hypovolemia.
Promote bedrest with head elevated.Decreases cardiac workload, facilitating circulatory homeostasis.
Monitor electrolyte levels, especially sodium.As fluid is pulled from extracellular spaces, sodium may follow the shift, causing hyponatremia.
Administer IV fluids (hypertonic saline) as needed.Replaces fluid and sodium losses to prevent or correct hypovolemia following outpatient procedures.
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Recommended Resources

Recommended nursing diagnosis and nursing care plan books and resources.

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See also

Other recommended site resources for this nursing care plan:

Other care plans and nursing diagnoses related to reproductive and urinary system disorders:

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Matt Vera is a registered nurse with a bachelor of science in nursing since 2009 and is currently working as a full-time writer and editor for Nurseslabs. During his time as a student, he knows how frustrating it is to cram on difficult nursing topics. Finding help online is nearly impossible. His situation drove his passion for helping student nurses by creating content and lectures that are easy to digest. Knowing how valuable nurses are in delivering quality healthcare but limited in number, he wants to educate and inspire nursing students. As a nurse educator since 2010, his goal in Nurseslabs is to simplify the learning process, break down complicated topics, help motivate learners, and look for unique ways of assisting students in mastering core nursing concepts effectively.
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