11 Fracture Nursing Care Plans

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In this nursing care plan guide are 11 nursing diagnosis for fracture. Know the assessment, goals, related factors, and nursing interventions with rationale for fracture in this guide.

A fracture is the medical term used for a broken bone. They occur when the physical force exerted on the bone is stronger than the bone itself. They commonly happen because of car accidents, falls or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the bones. Fracture is sometimes abbreviated FRX or Fx, Fx, or #.

Types of Fracture

There are many types of fractures, but the main categories are complete, incomplete, open, closed and pathological. Five major types are as follows:

  1. Incomplete: Fracture involves only a portion of the cross-section of the bone. One side breaks; the other usually just bends (greenstick).
  2. Complete: Fracture line involves entire cross-section of the bone, and bone fragments are usually displaced.
  3. Closed: The fracture does not extend through the skin.
  4. Open: Bone fragments extend through the muscle and skin, which is potentially infected.
  5. Pathological: Fracture occurs in diseased bone (such as cancer, osteoporosis), with no or only minimal trauma.

Nursing Care Plans

Nursing care planning of a patient with a fracture, whether in a cast or in traction, is based upon prevention of complications during healing. By performing an accurate nursing assessment on a regular basis, the nursing staff can manage the patient’s pain and prevent complications. On emergency trauma care basic include triage, assessment and maintaining airway, breathing, and circulation, protecting the cervical spine and assessing the level of consciousness.

Here are eleven (11) nursing care plans (NCP) and nursing diagnosis (NDx) for fracture: 

  1. Risk for Trauma: Falls
  2. Acute Pain
  3. Risk for Peripheral Neurovascular Dysfunction
  4. Risk for Impaired Gas Exchange
  5. Impaired Physical Mobility
  6. Impaired Skin Integrity
  7. Risk for Infection
  8. Deficient Knowledge
  9.  NEW  Risk for Injury
  10.  NEW  Self-Care Deficit
  11.  NEW  Constipation
  12. Other Nursing Diagnoses
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Other Nursing Diagnoses for Fracture

Other possible nursing care plans for fracture you can make based on these nursing diagnoses:

  1. Trauma, risk for—loss of skeletal integrity, weakness, balancing difficulties, reduced muscle coordination, lack of safety precautions, history of previous trauma.
  2. Mobility, impaired physical—neuromuscular skeletal impairment; pain/discomfort, restrictive therapies (limb immobilization); psychological immobility.
  3. Self-Care deficit—musculoskeletal impairment, decreased strength/endurance, pain.
  4. Infection, risk for—inadequate primary defenses: broken skin, traumatized tissues; environmental exposure; invasive procedures, skeletal traction.
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References and Sources

Recommended references and sources for this fracture nursing care plans:

  • Black, J. M., & Hawks, J. H. (2009). Medical-surgical nursing: Clinical management for positive outcomes (Vol. 1). A. M. Keene (Ed.). Saunders Elsevier. [Link]
  • Gulanick, M., & Myers, J. L. (2016). Nursing Care Plans: Diagnoses, Interventions, and Outcomes. Elsevier Health Sciences. [Link]
  • Hommel, A., Kock, M. L., Persson, J., & Werntoft, E. (2012). The Patient’s view of nursing care after hip fracture. ISRN nursing2012. [Link]
  • Willis, L. (2019). Professional guide to diseases. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. [Link]

See Also

You may also like the following posts and care plans:

Musculoskeletal Care Plans


Care plans related to the musculoskeletal system:

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